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Fulton County Divorce Lawyer

Fulton County Divorce Lawyer

Divorce is one of the most stressful events that a person goes through, and it is particularly difficult if children are involved. A good attorney will help you navigate the logistics of the divorce process, as well as get you started on the new chapter of your life.

Why Do I Need a Divorce Attorney?

All marriages are different, and so are all divorces. So while some might be very dramatic and volatile, others might be amicable. If you are having an amicable divorce, you might think that you don’t want an attorney to get involved. The truth is that you don’t have to. You can represent yourself, which is called proceeding “pro se.” Even in an amicable divorce, however, the divorce process is very complicated. A lawyer can help you navigate the difficulties so that your amicable split stays amicable. Competent divorce attorneys will get you started on the new chapter of your life sooner than if you did it yourself.

What Are the Requirements for Getting a Divorce in Fulton County?

  • One spouse must live in Georgia, and he or she must have been living in Georgia for at least six months
  • You must be “legally separated.” This does not mean that you have to live apart. You must no longer engage in marital relations and you both need to consider yourselves separated.
  • You have a ground for divorce.

What are the Grounds for Divorce in Fulton County?

You must present a reason to the court for getting a divorce. There are two types of divorce in Georgia: fault and no-fault. For fault divorce, one spouse tells the court a reason for the breakdown of the marriage. Some of these grounds are:

  • Impotency
  • Force or fraud in getting married
  • Mental or physical cruel treatment
  • Mental illness
  • Habitual intoxication
  • Infidelity
  • Desertion

No fault divorce is another option. One spouse states that the marriage is “irretrievably broken.”

What About Our Children?

The presence of children in a marriage makes hiring an attorney that much of a necessity. Custody is determined by what is in the “best interests of the child.” Sole custody, where one parent has custody, is an option. The other option is joint custody, of which there are two varieties: joint legal and joint physical. Joint legal custody is a situation where both parents have equal rights and responsibilities when it comes to major decisions affecting the child. Joint physical custody is a situation where the child has equal time with both parents.